Rulebooks: Contents

Rulebooks
Mainboard Rules
Catalist Rules
Definitions and Interpretation
Chapter 1 Introduction
Chapter 2 Sponsors
Chapter 3 Disciplinary and Appeals Procedures, and Enforcement Powers of the Exchange
Chapter 4 Equity Securities
Chapter 5 Reserved
Chapter 6 Reserved
Chapter 7 Continuing Obligations
Chapter 8 Changes in Capital
Chapter 9 Interested Person Transactions
Chapter 10 Acquisitions and Realisations
Chapter 11 Takeovers
Chapter 12 Circulars, Annual Reports and Electronic Communications
Chapter 13 Trading Halt, Suspension and Delisting
Chapter 14 Transition Rules
Appendices
Practice Notes
Code of Corporate Governance 2012
Remuneration Matters
SGX-ST Rules
CDP Clearing Rules
DVP Rules
CDP Depository Rules
Futures Trading Rules
SGX-DC Clearing Rules
SIAC DT Arbitration Rules
SIAC DC Arbitration Rules
Rule Amendments

  Versions
(1 version)
 
May 2 2012 onwards

Remuneration Matters

PROCEDURES FOR DEVELOPING REMUNERATION POLICIES

Principle:

7 There should be a formal and transparent procedure for developing policy on executive remuneration and for fixing the remuneration packages of individual directors. No director should be involved in deciding his own remuneration.

Guidelines:

7.1 The Board should establish a Remuneration Committee ("RC") with written terms of reference which clearly set out its authority and duties. The RC should comprise at least three directors, the majority of whom, including the RC Chairman, should be independent. All of the members of the RC should be non-executive directors. This is to minimise the risk of any potential conflict of interest. The Board should disclose in the company's Annual Report the names of the members of the RC and the key terms of reference of the RC, explaining its role and the authority delegated to it by the Board.
7.2 The RC should review and recommend to the Board a general framework of remuneration for the Board and key management personnel8. The RC should also review and recommend to the Board the specific remuneration packages for each director as well as for the key management personnel. The RC's recommendations should be submitted for endorsement by the entire Board. The RC should cover all aspects of remuneration, including but not limited to director's fees, salaries, allowances, bonuses, options, share-based incentives and awards, and benefits in kind.
7.3 If necessary, the RC should seek expert advice inside and/or outside the company on remuneration of all directors. The RC should ensure that existing relationships, if any, between the company and its appointed remuneration consultants will not affect the independence and objectivity of the remuneration consultants. The company should also disclose the names and firms of the remuneration consultants in the annual remuneration report, and include a statement on whether the remuneration consultants have any such relationships with the company.
7.4 The RC should review the company's obligations arising in the event of termination of the executive directors' and key management personnel's contracts of service, to ensure that such contracts of service contain fair and reasonable termination clauses which are not overly generous. The RC should aim to be fair and avoid rewarding poor performance.

LEVEL AND MIX OF REMUNERATION

Principle:

8 The level and structure of remuneration should be aligned with the long-term interest and risk policies of the company, and should be appropriate to attract, retain and motivate (a) the directors to provide good stewardship of the company, and (b) key management personnel to successfully manage the company. However, companies should avoid paying more than is necessary for this purpose.

Guidelines:

8.1 A significant and appropriate proportion of executive directors' and key management personnel's remuneration should be structured so as to link rewards to corporate and individual performance.Such performance-related remuneration should be aligned with the interests of shareholders and promote the long-term success of the company. It should take account of the risk policies of the company, be symmetric with risk outcomes and be sensitive to the time horizon of risks. There should be appropriate and meaningful measures for the purpose of assessing executive directors' and key management personnel's performance.
8.2 Long-term incentive schemes are generally encouraged for executive directors and key management personnel. The RC should review whether executive directors and key management personnel should be eligible for benefits under long-term incentive schemes. The costs and benefits of long-term incentive schemes should be carefully evaluated. In normal circumstances, offers of shares or grants of options or other forms of deferred remuneration should vest over a period of time. The use of vesting schedules, whereby only a portion of the benefits can be exercised each year, is also strongly encouraged. Executive directors and key management personnel should be encouraged to hold their shares beyond the vesting period, subject to the need to finance any cost of acquiring the shares and associated tax liability.
8.3 The remuneration of non-executive directors should be appropriate to the level of contribution, taking into account factors such as effort and time spent, and responsibilities of the directors. Non-executive directors should not be over-compensated to the extent that their independence may be compromised. The RC should also consider implementing schemes to encourage non-executive directors to hold shares in the company so as to better align the interests of such non-executive directors with the interests of shareholders.
8.4 Companies are encouraged to consider the use of contractual provisions to allow the company to reclaim incentive components of remuneration from executive directors and key management personnel in exceptional circumstances of misstatement of financial results, or of misconduct resulting in financial loss to the company.

DISCLOSURE ON REMUNERATION

Principle:

9 Every company should provide clear disclosure of its remuneration policies, level and mix of remuneration, and the procedure for setting remuneration, in the company's Annual Report. It should provide disclosure in relation to its remuneration policies to enable investors to understand the link between remuneration paid to directors and key management personnel, and performance.

Guidelines:

9.1 The company should report to the shareholders each year on the remuneration of directors, the CEO and at least the top five key management personnel (who are not also directors or the CEO) of the company. This annual remuneration report should form part of, or be annexed to the company's annual report of its directors. It should be the main means through which the company reports to shareholders on remuneration matters.

The annual remuneration report should include the aggregate amount of any termination, retirement and post-employment benefits that may be granted to directors, the CEO and the top five key management personnel (who are not directors or the CEO).
9.2 The company should fully disclose the remuneration of each individual director and the CEO on a named basis. For administrative convenience, the company may round off the disclosed figures to the nearest thousand dollars. There should be a breakdown (in percentage or dollar terms) of each director's and the CEO's remuneration earned through base/fixed salary, variable or performance-related income/bonuses, benefits in kind, stock options granted, share-based incentives and awards, and other long-term incentives.
9.3 The company should name and disclose the remuneration of at least the top five key management personnel (who are not directors or the CEO) in bands of S$250,000. Companies need only show the applicable bands. There should be a breakdown (in percentage or dollar terms) of each key management personnel's remuneration earned through base/fixed salary, variable or performance-related income/bonuses, benefits in kind, stock options granted, share-based incentives and awards, and other long-term incentives.

In addition, the company should disclose in aggregate the total remuneration paid to the top five key management personnel (who are not directors or the CEO).

As best practice, companies are also encouraged to fully disclose the remuneration of the said top five key management personnel.
9.4 For transparency, the annual remuneration report should disclose the details of the remuneration of employees who are immediate family members of a director or the CEO, and whose remuneration exceeds S$50,000 during the year. This will be done on a named basis with clear indication of the employee's relationship with the relevant director or the CEO. Disclosure of remuneration should be in incremental bands of S$50,000. The company need only show the applicable bands.
9.5 The annual remuneration report should also contain details of employee share schemes to enable their shareholders to assess the benefits and potential cost to the companies. The important terms of the share schemes should be disclosed, including the potential size of grants, methodology of valuing stock options, exercise price of options that were granted as well as outstanding, whether the exercise price was at the market or otherwise on the date of grant, market price on the date of exercise, the vesting schedule, and the justifications for the terms adopted.
9.6 For greater transparency, companies should disclose more information on the link between remuneration paid to the executive directors and key management personnel, and performance. The annual remuneration report should set out a description of performance conditions to which entitlement to short-term and long-term incentive schemes are subject, an explanation on why such performance conditions were chosen, and a statement of whether such performance conditions are met.

8 The term "key management personnel" shall mean the CEO and other persons having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the company.