Whole Section

  • 3.9

    Rule 5.12.2(i): Whether the volume or size of the order or transaction is excessive relative to reasonable expectations of the depth and liquidity of the market at the time.

    Added on 3 June 20193 June 2019.

    • 3.9.1

      This Rule does not restrict Trading Members and Trading Representatives trading significant volumes where there is a legitimate purpose for the transaction and where the transaction is executed in a proper manner. However, trading significant volumes with the purpose of controlling the price of a security or futures contract will amount to manipulative trading.

      Added on 3 June 20193 June 2019.

    • 3.9.2

      Example:

      A Trading Representative purchased substantial volume in a thinly traded counter, which accounted for a large proportion of the market volume, to establish a predetermined price. Sometimes, this may be followed by up-ticking the bid despite the absence of bona fide investor demand for the security or futures contract.

      Added on 3 June 20193 June 2019.

    • 3.9.3

      In the same vein, entering excessively large order(s) that is disproportionate to the depth of the order book may be manipulative, as it can create an imbalance between the quantum of demand and supply on the order book and in turn, mislead market participants with respect to interest in the security or futures contract.

      Added on 3 June 20193 June 2019.