Remuneration Matters

Past version: Effective from 01 Jan 2005 to 01 May 2012

PROCEDURES FOR DEVELOPING REMUNERATION POLICIES

Principle:

7 There should be a formal and transparent procedure for developing policy on executive remuneration and for fixing the remuneration packages of individual directors. No director should be involved in deciding his own remuneration.

Guidelines:

7.1 The Board should set up a Remuneration Committee ("RC") comprising entirely of non-executive directors, the majority of whom, including the Chairman, should be independent. This is to minimise the risk of any potential conflict of interest.
7.2 The RC will recommend to the Board a framework of remuneration, and the specific remuneration packages for each director and the CEO (or executive of equivalent rank) if the CEO is not a director. The RC's recommendations should be submitted for endorsement by the entire Board. The RC should cover all aspects of remuneration, including but not limited to director's fees, salaries, allowances, bonuses, options, and benefits in kind. The RC will also review the remuneration of senior management.

Commentaries:

7.3 If necessary, the RC should seek expert advice inside and/or outside the company on remuneration of all directors.

LEVEL AND MIX OF REMUNERATION

Principle:

8 The level of remuneration should be appropriate to attract, retain and motivate the directors needed to run the company successfully but companies should avoid paying more than is necessary for this purpose. A significant proportion of executive directors' remuneration should be structured so as to link rewards to corporate and individual performance.

Guidelines:

8.1 The performance-related elements of remuneration should be designed to align interests of executive directors with those of shareholders and link rewards to corporate and individual performance. There should be appropriate and meaningful measures for the purpose of assessing executive directors' performance.
8.2 The remuneration of non-executive directors should be appropriate to the level of contribution, taking into account factors such as effort and time spent, and responsibilities of the directors. Non-executive directors should not be over-compensated to the extent that their independence may be compromised.
8.3 In the case of service contracts, there should be a fixed appointment period for all executive directors. In any case, service contracts should not be excessively long or with onerous removal clauses. The RC should review what compensation commitments the directors' contracts of service, if any, would entail in the event of early termination. The RC should aim to be fair and avoid rewarding poor performance.
8.4 Long-term incentive schemes are generally encouraged. The RC should review whether directors should be eligible for benefits under long-term incentive schemes. The costs and benefits of long-term incentive schemes should be carefully evaluated. In normal circumstances, offers of shares or granting of options or other forms of deferred remuneration should vest over a period of time. The use of vesting schedules, whereby only a portion of the benefits can be exercised each year, is also strongly encouraged. Directors should be encouraged to hold their shares beyond the vesting period, subject to the need to finance any costs of acquisition and associated tax liability.

Commentaries:

8.5 In setting remuneration packages, the company should be aware of pay and employment conditions within the industry and in comparable companies. But they should use such comparison with caution, in view of the risk of an upward ratchet of remuneration levels with no corresponding improvements in performance.
8.6 Notice periods in service contracts should be set at a period of six months or less. If it is necessary to offer longer notice periods to new directors recruited from outside, such periods should reduce to six months or less after the initial notice period.

DISCLOSURE ON REMUNERATION

Principle:

9 Each company should provide clear disclosure of its remuneration policy, level and mix of remuneration, and the procedure for setting remuneration in the company's annual report. It should provide disclosure in relation to its remuneration policies to enable investors to understand the link between remuneration paid to directors and key executives, and performance.

Guidelines:

9.1 The company should report to the shareholders each year on the remuneration of directors and at least the top 5 key executives (who are not also directors) of the company. This annual remuneration report should form part of, or be annexed to the company's annual report of its directors. It should be the main vehicle through which the company reports to shareholders on remuneration matters. The members of the RC should be listed in the report.
9.2 The report should set out the names of directors and at least the top 5 key executives (who are not also directors) earning remuneration which falls within bands of S$250,000. There will be a breakdown (in percentage terms) of each director's remuneration earned through base/fixed salary, variable or performance-related income/bonuses, benefits in kind, and stock options granted and other long-term incentives. Companies are however encouraged, as best practice, to fully disclose the remuneration of each individual director.
9.3 For transparency, the report should disclose the same details of the remuneration of employees who are immediate family members5 of a director or the CEO, and whose remuneration exceed S$150,000 during the year. This can be done on a no-name basis with clear indication of which director or the CEO the employee is related to.
9.4 The report should also contain details of employee share schemes to enable their shareholders to assess the benefits and potential cost to the companies. The important terms of the share schemes, including the potential size of grants, methodology of valuing stock options, exercise price of options that were granted as well as outstanding, whether the exercise price was at the market or otherwise on the date of grant, market price on the date of exercise, the vesting schedule, and the justifications for the terms adopted, should be disclosed.

5 As defined in the Listing Manual of the Singapore Exchange to mean the spouse, child, adopted child, stepchild, brother, sister and parent.